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Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of Loyalty in Anglo-Saxon England found in the catalog.

Loyalty in Anglo-Saxon England

Elizabeth Hackett

Loyalty in Anglo-Saxon England

the literary ideal and the historical record.

by Elizabeth Hackett

  • 130 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Dissertation (B.A. History) - King Alfred"s College, 1981.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21686240M

  That book, perhaps more than any other, established the agenda for the study of the Vikings and those that they encountered. Among the issues raised was the source of silver in Viking-age Europe. Sawyer suggested there that “at least some” of the silver in England had come from Germany, where new silver mines were discovered in the : Matt Elton. Building Anglo-Saxon England demonstrates how hundreds of recent excavations enable us to grasp for the first time how regionally diverse the built environment of the Anglo-Saxons truly was. Blair identifies a zone of eastern England with access to the North Sea whose economy, prosperity, and timber buildings had more in common with the Low Brand: Princeton University Press.

Beowulf is the beloved character of the most well known Anglo-Saxon literature. The story “Beowulf” is his tale of heroic feats and epic battles. Throughout the story the essentials of Anglo-Saxon culture, bravery, friendship, generosity and loyalty are displayed each is important to the Anglo-Saxon lifestyle. The history of Anglo-Saxon England is told in what contemporary manuscript? Select: Anglo-Saxon Breviary Anglo-Saxon Chronicle Anglo-Saxon Missive Annals of the Kings Book of the Kings It originated in the regn of Alfred the Great, who may have ordered it to be compiled.

Online shopping for Anglo-Saxon - Great Britain from a great selection at Books Store.4/5. Book Description Boydell & Brewer Ltd, United Kingdom, Paperback. Condition: New. Revised ed. Language: English. Brand new Book. This book is an invaluable exploration of the significance of the sword as symbol and weapon in the Anglo-Saxon world, using archaeological and literary evidence/5(40).


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Loyalty in Anglo-Saxon England by Elizabeth Hackett Download PDF EPUB FB2

The book presupposes a reasonable understanding of English geography and political boundaries during the Anglo-Saxon period, so other books are necessary to fill that gap.

On the other hand there is simply no other work written which does as good a job in providing a detailed, comprehensive picture of Anglo-Saxon England as this one/5(49). Best Anglo Saxon Loyalty in Anglo-Saxon England book Score A book’s total score is based on multiple factors, including the number of people who have voted for it and how highly those voters ranked the book.

“Morris brilliantly revisits the Norman Conquest, “the single most important event in English history,” by following the body-strewn fortunes of its key players: England’s King Edward the Confessor; his hated father-in-law and England’s premier earl, Godwine; Harold II, the prior’s son and England’s last Anglo-Saxon king; and Edward’s cousin William, the fearsome duke of /5().

The Anglo-Saxons were a cultural group who inhabited England from the 5th century. They comprised people from Germanic tribes who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted many aspects of Anglo-Saxon culture and language.

The Anglo-Saxons established the Kingdom of England, and the modern English language owes almost half of. Loyalty and kinship were two very important influences on Anglo-Saxon society – the society that helped produce the Old English epic poem known as Beowulf.

It isn’t surprising, for instance. The Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain is the process which changed the language and culture of most of what became England from Romano-British to Germanic.

The Germanic-speakers in Britain, themselves of diverse origins, eventually developed a common cultural identity as process occurred from the mid-fifth to early seventh centuries, following the end of Roman rule in Britain. Books shelved as anglo-saxon-historical-fiction: Hild by Nicola Griffith, Beowulf: Dragonslayer by Rosemary Sutcliff, The Bone Thief by V.M.

Whitworth, T. Anglo-Saxon England was early medieval England, existing from the 5th to the 11th centuries from the end of Roman Britain until the Norman conquest in It consisted of various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until when it was united as the Kingdom of England by King Æthelstan (r.

It became part of the short-lived North Sea Empire of Cnut the Great, a personal union between England. 'outstanding one of the most valuable contributions ever made to our knowledge of the history of our own land' English Historical Review This book covers the emergence of the earliest English kingdoms to the establishment of the Anglo-Norman monarchy in Professor Stenton examines the development of English society, from the growth of royal power to the establishment of feudalism /5(3).

The Anglo-Saxon kings were adept at framing laws that reflected their authority. But they had the sense to take local customs into account when doing so. But Law and Order in Anglo-Saxon England has something still more significant to offer to the field of legal history.

Lambert is a specialist, but the decision to connect ‘law’ to ‘order’ is what gives this book value for the non-specialist. I INTRODUCTION: THE ORIGINS OF THE ANGLO-SAXON KINGDOMS 1 Written sources: British 1 Written sources: Anglo-Saxon 3 Archaeological evidence 5 The political structure of Anglo-Saxon England c.

9 The nature of early Anglo-Saxon kingship 15 Sources for the study of kings and kingdoms from the seventh to the ninth centuries 19 II KENT 25 Sources reconstructing the hero: representation of loyalty in late anglo-saxon literature Article (PDF Available) January with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Attributes of the Anglo-Saxon H ero. In Anglo-Saxon culture, a hero was a warrior, who was successful on the battlefield and illustrated great loyalty to his lord and tribe.

As illustrated in Beowulf and “The Wanderer,” the ideal hero was true to the comitatus. In other words, the hero kept his promise to his lord to fight whatever obstacle. Throughout the epic poem Beowulf, we can see key essentials of the Anglo-Saxon Culture such as bravery, friendship, generosity, and loyalty.

Probably the most important trait to them is loaylty. The Anglo-Saxons governing system was built on the fundamental of Loyalty. It shaped the very tribal culture in which they lived. This riveting and authoritative USA Today and Wall Street Journal bestseller is “a much-needed, modern account of the Normans in England” (The Times, London).

The Norman Conquest was the most significant military—and cultural—episode in English history. An invasion on a scale not seen since the days of the Romans, it was capped by one of the bloodiest and most decisive battles ever /5(17). Through close analysis and careful weighing of evidence the authors of this volume tackle a wide range of questions in Anglo-Saxon history and culture and often arrive at opinions different from those generally accepted.

Contributions are made on subjects as diverse as the Anglo-Saxon settlement, early Northumbrian history, the 'weapon' vocabulary of Beowulf, world history in the Anglo-Saxon 3/5(1). The strongest ties in Anglo-Saxon society were to kin and lord.

The ties of loyalty were to the person of a lord, not to his station. There was no real concept of patriotism or loyalty to a cause. This explains why dynasties waxed and waned so quickly.

A kingdom was only as strong as its war-leader. Describe Anglo-Saxon religion. Norse mythology - didn't believe in heaven, didn't care about afterlife, you had to be loyal and altruistic to be in songs and stories after you died so you could live on. _____ and _____ are the literary dates of the Anglo-Saxon period.

What is the reason for each date. andGermanic tribes invade Britian inHarold II takes throne inthen killed by William, Duke Of Normandy. Read "Anglo-Saxon England" by Sir Frank M. Stenton available from Rakuten Kobo. Discussing the development of English society, from the growth of royal power Brand: OUP Oxford.Anglo-Saxon England: a Bibliographical Handbook 2 [A17] N.J.

Higham, The English Conquest: Gildas and Britain in the Fifth Century (); N.J. Higham, An English Empire: Bede and the Early Anglo-Saxon Kings (); N. J. Higham, The Convert Kings: Power and Religious Affiliation in Early Anglo-Saxon England () - trilogy on the origins of England.Christianity in Anglo-Saxon England; The Poetry of Anglo-Saxon England; Movie Adaptations; Full Book Quiz; Section Quizzes; Character List; Analysis of Major Characters; Themes, Motifs, and Symbols; Lines ; Lines ; Lines ; Lines ; Lines ; Lines ; Lines ; Lines ; Lines